Saving up for your child’s Education Fund

I received a phone call from one of my clients yesterday evening just as I was on my way to a meeting in KL Sentral.

She expressed to me her concern on preparing for her daughter’s education. She already has a policy in place for her son & now she wants to do the same thing for her daughter. We did discuss this matter a few months after her daughter was born (more that a half year ago) but she has been too busy ever since & had other commitments to take care of.

I asked her what aroused her interest to get this policy approved immediately? She shared with me that although she can open an account with the bank or any other financial institution, there was always a lack of discipline.

By creating an education policy or using any other financial tool similar to it that will have the benefits of security, she can have a piece of mind. Like it or not, she MUST SAVE that money with my company at the end of every due date to accumulate that education fund when her daughter enters university.

The most beautiful part of all is, IF my client does not survive the next 18 or 20 years due to death, illness or permanent disablility, ALL the future premiums that she needs to SAVE with us for accumulating this policy will be WAIVED, thus the education fund is FREE.

A single act to prepare for an education fund such as this carries a million possibilities because with the knowledge & experience that one individual will gain with a proper education, he will not only upgrade his own standard of living but also have an impact on the lives of those around him.
This reminds me of the story of a farmer named Flemming. Here is the adaptation from http://www.indianchild.com :

His name was Fleming, and he was a poor Scottish farmer. One day, while trying to eke out a living for his family, he heard a cry for help coming from a nearby bog. He dropped his tools and ran to the bog. There, mired to his waist in black muck, was a terrified boy, screaming and struggling to free himself. Farmer Fleming saved the lad from what could have been a slow and terrifying death.

The next day, a fancy carriage pulled up to the Scotsman’s sparse surroundings. An elegantly dressed nobleman stepped out and introduced himself as the father of the boy Farmer Fleming had saved.

“I want to repay you,” said the nobleman. “You saved my son’s life.”

“No, I can’t accept payment for what I did,” the Scottish farmer replied, waving off the offer. At that moment, the farmer’s own son came to the door of the family hovel.

“Is that your son?” the nobleman asked. “Yes,” the farmer replied proudly.

“I’ll make you a deal. Let me take him and give him a good education.
If the lad is anything like his father, he’ll grow to a man you can be proud of.”

And that he did. In time, Farmer Fleming’s son graduated from St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London, and went on to become known throughout the world as the noted Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of Penicillin.

Years afterward, the nobleman’s son was stricken with pneumonia.

What saved him? Penicillin.

The name of the nobleman? Lord Randolph Churchill.

His son’s name? Sir Winston Churchill.


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